Tuesday, January 31, 2006

Cameron's women

The Conservative Party have traditionally been viewed as extremely reluctant to propose change in any form. Once change has occurred, however, they have historically been very good at adapting to it. The first great example was the Great Reform Act of 1832, which was seen as potentially devestating to an aristocrativ Tory party, but which actually paved the way for a revitalised Conservative movement. The second example would be female emancipation. Though initially ill-disposed towards the idea, the Conservative Party benefited from the universal franchise more than any other party, women proved to be the Conservative Party's greatest electoral asset, reliably voting Tory in greater numbers than men. Mike Smithson has an interesting post up on new polling figures that suggest that this advantage, lost by Major and Hague and only mildly recovered by Howard, may have been reversed by Cameron.

Many commentators on the right, both MSM and blogosphere, have been getting increasingly critical of Cameron's drift leftwards, real or merely symbolic, but what little indication there is would seem to suggest that at least some of the negative implications that the Conservatives have attracted have been wiped out in the last month. Unfortunately, a more electable Conservative Party is of little use if, once ensconced in power - still a big ask - it does not pursue any recognisably Conservative policies. For the moment Cameron can still hide behind the 'policy reviews' but at some point some concrete policies will have to be revealed. That's when we'll see what the true nature of the man is.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home